100 Issues Ago October 10

I’ve had a passing fondness for steampunk – never been a major fan, but have dipped in and out every now and then. When LADY MECHANIKA turned up, I was willing to give it a go and I was so glad that I did.

Joe Benitez’s art sold me on the title initially, although his writing had become better over the years (and I can’t believe it’s been over eight years since this first issue landed) and each of the subsequent mini-series have improved on the preceding one. Mechanika herself seems to be moving beyond the initial characterisation of a woman with no memory of her past and a need to find out her origins, and instead has become part of an ensemble cast of supporting characters who are as fully formed as herself.

There’s been at least one mini-series per year since 2015 (there was a delay between 2012 and 2015 as Benitez left Aspen and formed his own publisher) and, with a bit of luck, that’ll continue.

100 Issues Ago

I came across this “100 Issues Ago” panel in an old JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA and thought I’d tidy it up and re-purpose it. If one month = one issue, what was I reading 100 Issues Ago?

I have to admit that even in 2010, I knew very little of Mike Mignola’s work outside what he’d done for DC, principally COSMIC ODYSSEY. I was aware of Hellboy, of course, but I don’t think I’d ever read anything by this point – something I’ve been making up for over the last few months with the HELLBOY OMNIBUSES that Dark Horse have done.

THE AMAZING SCREW-ON HEAD was a gift from a friend, a hard back collection of some of Mignola’s short stories, many of which were delightfully weird – The Magician and The Snake works a treat, particularly. I might just hook this off my shelf and give it a re-read.

100 Issues Ago

I came across this “100 Issues Ago” panel in an old Justice League of America and thought I’d tidy it up and re-purpose it. If one month = one issue, what was I reading 100 Issues Ago?

DC Universe Legacies was very much in the spirit of the Marvels series that . . . er . . . Marvel had produced a few years before. It took a policeman from Metropolis, Paul Lincoln, and focused on him and his family as he recounted the big events of the DC Universe, essentially giving us a timeline of the DCU and how a normal person remembered them or was affected by them. This issue above, complete with lovely Kubert cover, dealt with the Justice Society of America’s retirement.

While I’ve often found Len Wein’s writing to be hit and miss, I do remember this series fondly, perhaps because I like the DCU it described – just a few months after the final issue, the New 52 would be launched and basically wipe out most everything covered in the ten issues of this series.

As an aside, I noticed that of the 24 issues I bought in August 2010, 20 (or 83%) of them were from DC. This August just gone: 19 issues bought, and 10 (or 53%) from DC.

I feel an end of the year graph coming on . . .

100 Issues Ago

I came across this “100 Issues Ago” panel in an old Justice League of America and thought I’d tidy it up and re-purpose it. If one month = one issue, what was I reading 100 Issues Ago?

Power Girl #12 was the last issue in the Palmiotti/Gray/Conner run and rounded out a superb series that really made the most of the character. The writing was spot on with a great mix of action and humour and the art looked gorgeous. Ther series continued for another year or so after they left, helmed by the less that excellent Judd Winick who very quickly went dark and serious, but at least Sami Basri continued the great look of the series.

It’s no surprise that Palmiotti and Conner later had such success with the Harley Quinn book and it was a delight to see them bring in their version of Power Girl with barely a nod to the New 52’s revamp of the character.

I know I’ve said it before, but if you haven’t picked up the collection of this series, you really should.