100 Issues Ago

I came across this “100 Issues Ago” panel in an old Justice League of America and thought I’d tidy it up and re-purpose it. If one month = one issue, what was I reading 100 Issues Ago?

Blackest Night comes barrelling to an end with this issue, with a ton of dead characters restored to life with white rings, Nekron defeated once and for all and the whole of the DCU seemingly geared up to begin Brightest Day.

As mad, sprawling, interconnected crossovers go, Blackest Night was great fun, with the various Rainbow Corps really getting a chance to shine. Sure, it had what felt like a bajillion crossovers into other series, but Geoff Johns was still writing hopeful stories at this point; with Flashpoint and Forever Evil to come in later years, this was probably the last of Johns big stories that I really enjoyed.

100 Issues Ago

I came across this “100 Issues Ago” panel in an old Justice League of America and thought I’d tidy it up and re-purpose it. If one month = one issue, what was I reading 100 Issues Ago?

Sadly, I was reading this, the final issue of Justice League: Cry For Justice.

James Robinson rightly won much acclaim for his run on Starman where the stories of Jack Knight, his family and friends and even his enemies were told with rare heart and feeling.

Some time later, he wrote this which featured Red Arrow getting his arm ripped off, the casual off-screen slaying of most of the Global Guardians and the death of Lian Harper, Red Arrow’s daughter, amidst the destruction of Star City.

God, it was awful.

100 Issues Ago

I came across this “100 Issues Ago” panel in an old Justice League of America and thought I’d tidy it up and re-purpose it. If one month = one issue, what was I reading 100 Issues Ago?

This was the teaser/taster issue for Neonomicon, the continuation of Alan Moore’s Lovecraftian story The Courtyard. It had about 8 or so pages from the first issue of the mini-series and damn it was good – enough to make me eagerly await the continuation even more than I had been since reading The Courtyard some six or seven years before then.

And what made it even better was the eventual follow up to Neonomicon in the form of Providence.

My views on Moore have changed over the years but his Lovecraftian epic still holds up and is well worth reading even if you’ve never read a single story by Lovecraft.

Ph’nglui mglw’nafh Cthulhu R’lyeh wgah’nagl fhtagn, my friends.

100 Issues Ago

I came across this “100 Issues Ago” panel in an old Justice League of America and thought I’d tidy it up and re-purpose it. If one month = one issue, what was I reading 100 Issues Ago?

Gail Simone’s Secret Six run was always a delight, whether as part of the Villains United run-up to Infinite Crisis, the mini-series that followed that or the well deserved ongoing series it had later. She took a bunch of misfit criminals, weirdos and anti-heroes and made them into a bizarre, messed up family that you couldn’t help but care about, without shying away from the fact that most of them were killers.

Sadly, the New 52 version by Simone didn’t catch on so well, possibly because the new team (even with a few old favourites) just didn’t seem to work together so well, even with the re-introduction of Elongated Man and Sue Dibny, an event which should have attracted more attention given the uproar caused by Ralph and Sue’s deaths in previous years.

Still, the first few volumes of Secret Six are well worth picking up if you’ve never read them.